Obama accepts nomination, defends rights of minorities

Thousands of delegates hear message of unity, diversity

President Barack Obama asked the Democratic National Convention — and the American people — Thursday night for patience and renewed his promise of hope and to move the country forward. Photo by David Lari/QNotes

By
September 6, 2012 | 9:37 pm
(Updated: February 25, 2013 | 3:16 pm)

Story by Matt Comer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — With flags, banners and signs flying as chants and applause filled Time Warner Cable Arena, President Barack Obama on Thursday accepted his nomination to run again for president.

Like the rest of the three-day 2012 Democratic National Convention, Obama’s acceptance speech hit on a variety of themes as varied as economic recovery, healthcare, immigration reform, religious diversity, national defense, energy policy and civil rights.

Some of the evening’s loudest cheers came after several mentions of Obama’s successful capture and killing of Osama Bin Laden.

The President also addressed Republicans directly, chiding their intense focus on Russia as an international enemy at their Republican Convention in Tampa, Fla.

“After all, you don’t call Russia — not al Qaeda — our number one enemy unless your still stuck in a Cold War time warp,” Obama said.

Obama also stressed the importance of economic recovery without hurting working Americans. “You can choose a future where we reduce our deficit without wrecking our middle class,” he said.

“I refuse to ask middle class families to give up their deductions for owning a home or raising their kids just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut,” Obama said. “I refuse to ask students to pay more for college; or kick children out of Head Start programs, or eliminate health insurance for millions of Americans who are poor and elderly or disabled — all so those with the most can pay less. I’m not going along with that. And I will never turn Medicare into a voucher. No American should ever have to spend their golden years at the mercy of insurance companies. They should retire with the care and dignity they have earned.”

Gay Americans were also mentioned in the speech, as Obama stood up for minority groups traditionally scapegoated for the nation’s challenges.

“We don’t think that government can solve all of our problems,” Obama asserted. “But we don’t think that government is the source of all our problems ñ any more than are welfare recipients, or corporations, or unions, or immigrants, or gays, or any other group we’re told to blame for our troubles,” Obama added to great applause and “LGBT for Obama” signs waved in the crowd.

Gay members of the U.S. Armed Services were also given a nod, as Obama said those gathered at the convention and those who voted for him are the reason “why selfless soldiers won’t be kicked out of the military because of who they are or who they love.”

Obama also addressed voter apathy. “If you turn away now — if you buy into the cynicism that the change we fought for isn’t possible —well, change will not happen,” he said. “If you give up on the idea that your voice can make a difference, then other voices will fill the void: lobbyists and special interests; the people with the $10 million checks who are trying to buy this election and those who are making it harder for you to vote; Washington politicians who want to decide who you can marry, or control health care choices that women should make for themselves.”

Obama’s final remarks resulted in deafening applause, chants of “U.S.A.” and “four more years.”

With 61 days until the election, the campaigns now enter the final stage of the election season.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Leave your opinion here. Please be nice. Your Email address will be kept private.
Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin